Giovanni Style Shrimp Scampi

shrimp

If you have ever been a tourist or even a local in Hawaii, you must have visited the famous “Giovanni Shrimp Truck” in the North Shore. I remember that I used to drive 30- 45 minutes literally almost every weekend from where I lived in town to Kahuku just to eat at the place. I’ve tried some other shrimp trucks too in Kahuku, but they never tasted the same or even close to Giovanni. Their sauce is even on sale in bottles at Walmart in Hawaii. At least, I found some before.

Now, that I have moved away from Hawaii… every once in a while, I miss Giovanni’s shrimp. So, I came across this recipe that is very close and similar to it. I was in heaven, It’s so ono and so easy to make! Happy trying!

Ingredients:

1 lb big shrimp, headless, shell-on, tail-on, deveined
Scant 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 oz unsalted butter (1/2 stick)
1 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
5 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
2 tablespoons white wine
Salt, to taste
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon fish sauce (optional)
Squirts of lemon juice
1/2 heaping teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Clean and rinse the shrimp and deveined. Pat dry with paper towels.

In a big plastic bowl or container, mix the flour and the cayenne pepper together. Transfer all the shrimp into the flour, toss around to coat the shrimp lightly with the flour. Transfer the shrimp out and dust off the excess flour. DO NOT OVERCOAT with too much flour. You just want a very light dust of flour on the shrimp. Discard the flour mixture.

Heat up a saute pan and add the butter. As soon as the butter melts, add the olive oil. Add the garlic and stir well before adding the shrimp into the pan. Saute the shrimp and keep stirring. Add the white wine, salt, sugar, and fish sauce (if using). Continue to saute until the shrimp is nicely cooked. Add a squirt or two of the lemon juice and the black pepper. Stir to combine well and serve immediately.

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Flavorbliss Lazy Mainland Style Laulau

 

laulau

I’m always homesick. Coming from Hawaii, I always miss the beaches, the people, the Aloha spirit, and the food. Since I’m on the mainland, I have always tried to make the local Hawaiian food myself to kill the food craving and homesickness. Trying out different kind of recipes.

I gathered this recipe from 3 different recipes. And so far, below is what I got and I have been happy with it. I have made it numerous times. Everyone loves it. It is the “lazy” shortcut kind, and mainland style because some ingredients you can’t even find them here, such as the taro and ti leaves. But, I found that, the banana leaves makes up for the ti leaves, and the canned spinach makes up for the taro leaves.

SO, it’s a lu’au!, and it’s ono! šŸ™‚

Dried banana leaves
Cooking string/ twine
Cod or butter fish (optional- I normally don’t put any fish)
1 big slice of pork belly (I use this instead of fish), cut up into 1 inch cubes
Sea salt or kosher salt
2 cans (or more) of Del Monte spinach (I ALWAYS use Del Monte brand- to me, it has taste and smell like taro leaves)
1 lb pork butt, cut up or cubed

Season pork butt with salt. Give about 3-4 big pinches on each bundle (explanation below). If you use fish, also cut up the fish, or pork belly and season with salt. When you are done, prepare the banana leaves. Once you clean and dry up the leaves and they become soft, cut about 10- 12 inch in length. You want to make sure that at the end, you can wrap those pork like a bundle or a present. Place the cut up pork at the bottom, thenĀ the fish or pork belly, and season with salt on top. When they are done, place a handful of spinach on top of them then wrap your leaves into a bundle and secure it with the string on all fours sides. Make sure it is all tie up and secured.

Your choice of using steamer or crockpot, make sure you place the seam on the bottom to avoid the leaves from opening up. If you use crockpot, set it on low for 6-8 hours. I always put about 1/2 cup of water before I turn the crockpot on, so the laulau are moist and not too salty. If you use steamer, pile them in steamer, with metal strainer underneath so they don’t touch the water. You will be steaming for a while, at least for about 4 hours. Keep on checking though, especially for water level. You don’t want your laulau to burn. They will smell bad.

Easy and simple, right? That is why I called it “lazy”! Good luck.

Miso Glazed Fish for Two

I love seafood, but eating fish has always been a challenge for me. So, I’m always looking for creative way on how to cook fish.

Since I lived in Hawaii, I have been a fond of miso, and in Hawaii, they have what they called miso butterfish… yuuummm-o! It has always been my favorite. But, where I live now, it has been difficult to find butterfish. So, since there are plenty of salmon, and I can find frozen mahi-mahi in Costco, I have been using those two interchangeably when cooking miso glazed fish.Ā IĀ think so though, that you can also use halibut or sea bass, and they would taste good.

This recipe is very easy and simple to make. It would surprised you that it tastes sooo good!

2 tablespoon packed brown sugar
1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons white miso (soybean paste)
1/4 cup sherry
4 tsp mirin
2 (6-ounce) fish fillets
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives for garnish

Preheat broiler or grill.

Combine first 5 ingredients, stirring with a whisk. Arrange fish in a shallow baking dish coated with cooking spray. Spoon miso mixture evenly over fish. Leave the fish to marinade overnight.

Broil or grill for 10 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, basting twice with miso mixture. Sprinkle with chives.

Serve over bed of salad or rice. Enjoy!!

Published in: on August 10, 2010 at 12:06 PM  Comments (1)  
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